February ‘16
Achieving Success One Icon at a Time

February ‘16
Khaled Fadda…
Khaled Fadda…


    


How did your journey in the business begin?

I discovered my passion for photography late 1996; I pursued this passion as a hobby by photographing my friends and the behind the scenes shots of some video clips. One thing led to the other and I found that my name was demanded and people trusted me. This was very hard back in the days because the photography process was very different. We didn’t have the luxury of seeing pictures before they were printed. I started working in the good old days of negative and slide. I am very proud that I got to work with these tools. I worked with several agencies before I decided to be a professional photographer by the beginning of 2003.


Do you remember your first professional shoot?

My first professional shoot was for Saber Rebai’s album ‘Khallas Tarak’ (Take Your Revenge). My first album poster was for Assi Hallani’s ‘Mali Saber Ya Nas’ (I Have No Patience).


With the technology revolution invading the world, how far has the creative process changed since you started?

It changed a lot. As I mentioned earlier I started working with the negative and slide, back then we took lots of time just to produce a simple photo. The process was very risky and it required a whole production process. Besides, at any point the negative was at risk to be deformed and you don’t have a backup for it. Now everything is easy and handy.


What is your favourite type of photography? And where do you find inspiration?

I simply like shooting people. My inspiration is driven by many factors: Teamwork, an idea that hits me, a movie scene I saw or a conversation I had with someone.


Did you reach your dream?

Around 90% yes. One of my friends once asked me, “what you aim to do in the future?”. I told her I wish to be a role model for the younger generation of photographers. I receive a lot of requests from aspiring photographers and I try to help them all, I ask them to send me their pictures and help them as much as possible. 


By Rania Ihab