December ‘17
Taking the Makeup Scene by Storm

December ‘17
Asma Sherif Moneer
Asma Sherif Moneer


    


It took Asma Sherif Moneer’s vigorous soul, competent skill, and modern mentality to be a gloriously premium makeup artist. Her exclusive flair outstandingly shined in the field of makeup art while she worked with some glamorous celebrities like Yosra El Lozy, Riham Abdel Ghafour, and Salma Abu Deif. Through her deep passion for makeup, she aspires to reach every woman out there and motivate them to follow their wildest dreams.

You worked as a director for a while as well as produced a music video. Why did you decide to make a career shift to makeup?

I believe that all genres of art are connected, and I love exploring different careers to discover more about my inner abilities and get the best of both worlds. It helps me gain new knowledge and perceive a thing or two about everything, thus acquiring a clearer vision about what I want to do in life. Singing and producing a music track aren’t jobs for me; they are more like leisure activities.


What do you love the most about makeup?

For me, makeup is an art and a way of self-expression, not just some shades that you apply on your face based on recent trends. Through makeup, you can deliver powerful messages, whether that be something as extreme as resisting racism, or simply expressing the beauty within you outwards.


What made you switch to cruelty-free makeup products?

Mariam Al Khosht was the first one who taught me about the concept of animal testing, but I have not fully switched to cruelty-free makeup products just yet. Sometimes I end up using animal-tested products because it demands extensive research to make sure whether this product is as cruelty-free as it claims or not. Unfortunately, I don’t have enough time to do so, but I definitely think it is an unjustifiably inhumane process, especially because there are amazing alternatives nowadays.


How can consumers contribute to putting an end to animal-tested products?

I boycott wearing real fur, or 100% percent authentic leather, and I think people should do the same. There are many companies like NYX and Anastasia Beverly Hills that made the switch to cruelty-free cosmetics, which give consumers a wide range of choices and varieties. On the other hand, there are major production industries that employ underage kids in exchange for little to no pay, alongside mistreating them. I think it’s just as important to stand up against these industries as well.


Do you have any source of inspiration for your work?

I find my muse in random and sometimes weird details around me. However, if there is one thing that could be awe-inspiring to me, it will always be music.


In your opinion, what are the challenges that face makeup artists in Egypt?

People still underestimate the makeup industry and some still look down upon makeup artists. I remember getting myself in trouble once for the way I reacted to a client who mistreated me. Actors on the red carpet, on the other hand, give makeup artists credit because they acknowledge the significant contribution they make to their glamour that everyone loves. A remarkable example of makeup art momentousness is how makeup artists manage to transform Meryl Streep into Margaret Thatcher in her indelible role in ‘The Iron Lady’.


You have worked with plenty of beautiful celebrities. Who do you aspire to work with in the future?

I hope to get to work with the stunning, and uniquely beautiful Queen Rania of Jordan; the wild Lady Gaga, and the one-of-a-kind Rihanna. All three seek to empower women and that’s what I highlight and support through my work.